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Electronic Structure, Localization and 5f Occupancy in Pu Materials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 June 2012

Scott Richmond
Affiliation:
Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, U.S.A.
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Abstract

The electronic structure of delta plutonium (δ-Pu) and plutonium compounds is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Results for δ-Pu show a small component of the valence electronic structure which might reasonably be associated with a 5f 6 configuration. PES results for PuTe are used as an indication for the 5f 6 configuration due to the presence of atomic multiplet structure. Temperature dependent PES data on δ-Pu indicate a narrow peak centered 20 meV below the Fermi energy and 100 meV wide. The first PES data for PuCoIn5 indicate a 5f electronic structure more localized than the 5fs in the closely related PuCoGa5. There is support from the PES data for a description of Pu materials with an electronic configuration of 5f 5 with some admixture of 5f 6 as well as a localized/delocalized 5f 5 description.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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