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Electronic Defects in Silicon after Transient Isothermal Annealing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

G. Pensl
Affiliation:
Institute of Applied Physics, University Erlangen, Glückstr. 9, D–8520 Erlangen, FRG
M. Schulz
Affiliation:
Institute of Applied Physics, University Erlangen, Glückstr. 9, D–8520 Erlangen, FRG
P. Stolz
Affiliation:
Institute of Applied Physics, University Erlangen, Glückstr. 9, D–8520 Erlangen, FRG
N.M. Johnson
Affiliation:
Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, Palo Alto, CA 94304
J.F. Gibbons
Affiliation:
Stanford Electronics Laboratories, Stanford, CA 94305
J. Hoyt
Affiliation:
Stanford Electronics Laboratories, Stanford, CA 94305
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Abstract

We have investigated trap levels in silicon after Thermal Pulse Annealing (TPA). Three different annealing systems consisting of tungsten lamps or a graphite heater have been applied. Trap levels induced in different silicon materials (Cz, FZ, Epi) after TPA have been studied by DLTS and admittance spectroscopy. In boron-doped epitaxial silicon and As+- implanted pn-junctions (Cz grown Si), we have observed a prevalent trap level at concentrations of up to 1015cm−3 (depending on anneal conditions and silicon material). The ionization energy of this trap level is Ev+300meV.

The concentration of the 300 meV-level was studied as a function of the annealing temperature and the quench rate. The thermal pre-processing history strongly affects the trap concentration induced by TPA. The 300 meV-level is almost completely removed by a subsequent furnace anneal at TA > 400°C

Further trap levels are created in boron- and aluminum- doped silicon by Ar+ or 30Si+ implantation and TPA. The defect natures are discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1984

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