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Electrochemical Properties of Solution Synthesized Undoped and Aluminum Doped Lithium Manganate Thin Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 September 2012

S.R. Das
Affiliation:
PO Box 23343, Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931
N.K. Karan
Affiliation:
PO Box 23343, Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931
S.B. Majumder
Affiliation:
PO Box 23343, Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931
R.S. Katiyar
Affiliation:
PO Box 23343, Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00931
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Abstract

The spinel structured lithium manganate (LMO) is a promising cathode material for lithium ion rechargeable micro-batteries due to its higher energy density, environmentally benign nature, and low cost. To date, self-discharge and capacity fading (4 and 3V range), especially at elevated temperatures, still remains major research issues of LMO based cathodes. In the present work we have successfully synthesized lithium manganate thin films by a cost effective solution growth technique. These films exhibited excellent reversible lithium ion intercalation behavior with a discharge capacity of about 55.08:Ahcm−2:m−1 at a load of 20:Acm−2. The Li+ diffusivity was found to increase by substituting a part of manganese with aluminum (Al) in LMO lattice. Al substituted LMO films exhibited better cycleability as compared to the undoped LMO films. Further studies are in progress to investigate the effect of Al substitution on the cycleability of the films.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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