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Electrical Transport Properties of Rare Earth Doped Pentatellurides

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2011

Nathan D. Lowhorn
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, U.S.A
Terry M. Tritt
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, U.S.A
R. T. Littleton IV
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, U.S.A
Edward E. Abbott
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, U.S.A
J. W. Kolis
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634, U.S.A
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Abstract

The transition metal pentatellurides HfTe5 and ZrTe5 exhibit a broad resistive anomaly as a function of temperature. This behavior is also reflected in the thermopower as it changes from a large positive value below room temperature to a large negative value at lower temperatures with the zero crossing corresponding well with the peak temperature of the resistive anomaly. The large values of the thermopower at low temperatures (T ≈ 150 K) have made these materials attractive for investigation for potential low temperature thermoelectric applications. The magnitude of the resistive peak and the peak temperature are highly sensitive to doping as well as external influences such as magnetic field and pressure. In this study we examine the effect of doping with various rare earth elements (RE = Ce, Sm and Dy) and the subsequent effects on the electrical resistivity and the thermopower. These results will be discussed in relation to the thermoelectric performance of these materials.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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