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Electrical Porous Silicon Microarray for dna Hybridization Detection

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Marie Archer
Affiliation:
Center for Future Health and Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642
Marc Christophersen
Affiliation:
Center for Future Health and Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642
Philippe M. Fauchet
Affiliation:
Center for Future Health and Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642
Deoram Persaud
Affiliation:
Departments of Microelectronic Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623
Karl D. Hirschman
Affiliation:
Departments of Microelectronic Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623
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Abstract

The sensitivity of Porous Silicon (PSi) to the presence of charged molecules and its large internal surface area represent two important properties that make this material and ideal candidate for electrical biosensor development. We have demonstrated the use of a macroporous silicon electrical sensor for label-free detection of DNA hybridization in real time as well as identification of organic solvents in liquid phase. Binding of DNA inside the PSi matrix induces a change in capacitance and conductance. Having demonstrated the suitability of macroporous silicon layers for real time detection of DNA hybridization on single devices, we have extended our findings to the fabrication of a microarray with individual device electrical addressing capabilities. On a crystalline p-type silicon wafer, process steps such as KOH etching and electrochemical dissolution are employed in selected regions to create a free-standing porous membrane for sensing applications. Individual electrical contacts are made on the front side of the wafer while the infiltration of the probe and target molecules is done from the back avoiding any direct interaction of the molecules with the contact sites. We will report on the design considerations of the electrical porous silicon array and the preliminary results obtained using synthetic DNA as a model molecule.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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References

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