Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-66d7dfc8f5-4n6vw Total loading time: 0.322 Render date: 2023-02-08T21:33:29.622Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Electrical Detection of Protein Biomarkers Using Nanoneedle Biosensors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 May 2012

Rahim Esfandyarpour
Affiliation:
Center for Integrated Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University Stanford Genome Technology Center; 855 California Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA Phone: +1-650-387-5976, Email: rahimes@stanford.edu
Hesaam Esfandyarpour
Affiliation:
Center for Integrated Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University
Mehdi Javanmard
Affiliation:
Stanford Genome Technology Center; 855 California Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA Phone: +1-650-387-5976, Email: rahimes@stanford.edu
James S. Harris
Affiliation:
Center for Integrated Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University
Ronald W. Davis
Affiliation:
Stanford Genome Technology Center; 855 California Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA Phone: +1-650-387-5976, Email: rahimes@stanford.edu
Get access

Abstract:

Here we present the development of an array of electrical nano-biosensors in a microfluidic channel, called Nanoneedle biosensors. Then we present the proof of concept study for protein detection. A Nanoneedle biosensor is a real-time, label-free, direct electrical detection platform, which is capable of high sensitivity detection, measuring the change in ionic current and impedance modulation, due to the presence or reaction of biomolecules such as proteins or nucleic acids. We show that the sensors which have been fabricated and characterized for the protein detection. We have functionalized Nanoneedle biosensors with receptors specific to a target protein using physical adsorption for immobilization. We have used biotinylated bovine serum albumin as the receptor and sterptavidin as the target analyte. The detection of streptavidin binding to the receptor protein is also presented.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

References:

[1]Assembling Amperometric Biosensors for Clinical Diagnostics”; María Soledad Belluzo, et al. Sensors 2008, 8, 1366–1399 10.3390/s8031366CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[2]An electrochemical approach to the studies of biological redox reactions and their applications to biosensors, bioreactors, and biofuel cells”; Tokuji Ikeda, et al; Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering; Volume 92, Issue 1, 2001, Pages 9–18.10.1016/S1389-1723(01)80191-2CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[3]Electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization based on silver-enhanced gold nanoparticle label”; Hone Cai, et al. Analvtica Chimica Acta; Volume 469, Issue 2, 3 October 2002, Pages 165–172.10.1016/S0003-2670(02)00670-0CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[4]Electochemical DNA Hybridization Biosensors”; J. Justin Gooding et al.; Electroanalysis; Volume 14, Issue 17, Pages 1149–1156, September 2002 10.1002/1521-4109(200209)14:17<1149::AID-ELAN1149>3.0.CO;2-83.0.CO;2-8>CrossRef3.0.CO;2-8>Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Electrical Detection of Protein Biomarkers Using Nanoneedle Biosensors
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Electrical Detection of Protein Biomarkers Using Nanoneedle Biosensors
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Electrical Detection of Protein Biomarkers Using Nanoneedle Biosensors
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *