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Electrical Conductivity of High Impact Polystyrene/Liquid Crystalline Polymer/ Carbon Black Ternary Systems

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Roza Tchoudakov
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology Technion City, Haifa 32000, Israel. E-mail: narkis@tx.technion.ac.il
Ester Segal
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology Technion City, Haifa 32000, Israel. E-mail: narkis@tx.technion.ac.il
Moshe Narkis
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology Technion City, Haifa 32000, Israel. E-mail: narkis@tx.technion.ac.il
Arnon Siegmann
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology Technion City, Haifa 32000, Israel
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Abstract

Electrically conductive immiscible polymer blends containing high impact polystyrene (HIPS), liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) and a low content of conductive carbon black (CB) were studied to establish and understand the correlation between composition, electrical properties and the morphology of filaments produced at different melt flow conditions. The HIPS/LCP/CB blend containing 30% LCP and at least 2 phr CB reveals a stable resisitivity throughout the shear rate range applied in a capillary rheometer. Interesting structure alterations were observed for the LCP and CB components as a result of melt flow processing. Unusual sensing properties of liquids were found for the blends containing LCP.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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References

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