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Electrical Characterization of Thick InGaN Films for Photovoltaic Applications

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 February 2014

Yoshitaka Nakano
Affiliation:
Chubu University, 1200 Matsumoto, Kasugai, Aichi 487-8501, Japan
Liwen Sang
Affiliation:
National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan
Masatomo Sumiya
Affiliation:
National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan
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Abstract

We have electrically characterized a 300 nm-thick unintentionally-doped In0.09Ga0.91N film grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on a GaN template, employing capacitance-voltage (C-V), thermal admittance spectroscopy (TAS), and steady-state photocapacitance spectroscopy (SSPC) techniques on Schottky barrier diodes. TAS measurements revealed a degenerating-like shallow-donor defect with a thermal activation energy of ∼7 meV, which most likely acts as a source of residual carriers with their concentration of ∼1017 cm-3 determined from C-V measurements. Additionally, SSPC measurements revealed two characteristic deep-level defects located at ∼2.07 and ∼3.05 eV below the conduction band, which were densely enhanced near the underlayer. These electronic defects are probably introduced by alloying InN with GaN.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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