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Effects of Rocks and Backfill Materials on Waste Glass Leaching

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2011

K. Ishiguro
Affiliation:
Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, Tokai-mura, Japan
N. Sasaki
Affiliation:
Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, Tokai-mura, Japan
H. Kashihara
Affiliation:
Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, Tokai-mura, Japan
M. Yamamoto
Affiliation:
Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, Tokai-mura, Japan
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Abstract

Extensive studies have been made on the interactions between a waste glass and repository materials under static conditions. One of the PNC reference glasses was leached in the solution prepared from water in contact with crushed granite, tuff, diabase and backfill materials such as bentonite and zeolite. The leachant solutions except for some bentonite solutions reduced the glass leach rate compared with that measured in distilled water. The extent of the reduction was a function of silicon concentration in solution. The bentonite solutions enhanced the glass dissolution rate by a factor of 2 to 3 at low bentonite/water ratios but the effect was found to be less important at high bentonite/water ratios and in the long-term experiment. Addition of granite and zeolite to the bentonite solutions decreased the leach rate below the value measured in distilled water.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1985

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