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Effects of N2O addition on the properties of ZnO thin films grown using high-temperature H2O generated by catalytic reaction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 January 2014

Naoya Yamaguchi
Affiliation:
Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188, Japan
Eichi Nagatomi
Affiliation:
Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188, Japan
Takahiro Kato
Affiliation:
Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188, Japan
Koichiro Ohishi
Affiliation:
Nagaoka National College of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-8532, Japan
Yasuhiro Tamayama
Affiliation:
Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188, Japan
Kanji Yasui
Affiliation:
Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188, Japan
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Abstract

The effects of N2O gas addition on the properties of zinc oxide films grown on a-plane (11-20) sapphire (a-Al2O3) substrates were investigated, using a chemical vapor deposition method based on the reaction between dimethylzinc and high-energy H2O produced by a Pt-catalyzed H2-O2 reaction. By employing an optimal N2O gas pressure, both the film crystallinity and crystal orientation were improved. Subsequent to treatment with N2O, the electron mobility of films at room temperature increased from 207 to 234 cm2/Vs while the electron concentration decreased at low temperatures. In addition, the photoluminescence peak intensity of the nearband-edge emission was increased.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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Effects of N2O addition on the properties of ZnO thin films grown using high-temperature H2O generated by catalytic reaction
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