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Effects of Hyperthermal Carbon Subimplantation Doping on the Raman Spectra of Gaas

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

P. Fons
Affiliation:
Electrotechnical Laboratory, 1-1-4 Umezono, Tsukuba 305, Japan
Yunosuke Makita
Affiliation:
Electrotechnical Laboratory, 1-1-4 Umezono, Tsukuba 305, Japan
Shinji Kimura
Affiliation:
Electrotechnical Laboratory, 1-1-4 Umezono, Tsukuba 305, Japan
Tsutomu Iida
Affiliation:
Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-mita, Tama, Kawasaki 214, Japan
Akimasa Yamada
Affiliation:
Electrotechnical Laboratory, 1-1-4 Umezono, Tsukuba 305, Japan
Hajime Shibata
Affiliation:
Electrotechnical Laboratory, 1-1-4 Umezono, Tsukuba 305, Japan
Akira Obara
Affiliation:
Electrotechnical Laboratory, 1-1-4 Umezono, Tsukuba 305, Japan
Yushin Tsai
Affiliation:
Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-mita, Tama, Kawasaki 214, Japan
Shin-Ichiro Uekusa
Affiliation:
Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-mita, Tama, Kawasaki 214, Japan
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Abstract

The structural effects of low-energy (30-500 eV), mass separated C12 Ion doping of GaAs simultaneous with conventional solid source MBE growth have been studied using room-temperature raman scattering, Hall-effect, transmission electron microscopy and 2K photoluminesence measurements for GaAs epitaxy temperatures of 550 ºC. Results indicate good acceptor activation without detectable residual damage is achieved for ion energies ≤ 240 eV, while at EIon = 500 eV, residual damage is present with a corresponding reduction in electrical activation. Low-energy TRIM calculations indicate that the damage is related to the increased depth distribution of vacancies and interstitials created during the higher (500 eV) implantation process which can not be annealed out at growth temperatures. Constant energy (100 eV) film growth experiments for a range of implantation currents (45 pA/cm2 - 45 nA/cm2) and growth temperatures of 550 and 550 ºC, show LO Raman peak broadening and mode hardening for currents ≥15 nA while maintaining very high C acceptor activation. This is interpreted as residual stress due to small amounts of interstitial C in the highest doped films. Both Hall mobility measurements and photoluminesence show no evidence of C dopant compensation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

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References

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Effects of Hyperthermal Carbon Subimplantation Doping on the Raman Spectra of Gaas
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