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Effects of Different CH4-H2 Gas Compositions on the Morphology and Growth of Diamond Grown by Hot Filament CVD

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

Edward N. Farabaugh
Affiliation:
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Ceramics Division Gaithersburg, MD 20899
Albert Feldman
Affiliation:
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Ceramics Division Gaithersburg, MD 20899
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Abstract

Diamond films have been grown on single crystal Si and polycrystalline mullite substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. Both substrates offer a good thermal expansion match with diamond. Gas mixture ratios of CH4 :H2 ranged from 0.1–1.0%. The remaining deposition parameters were: substrate temperature, 750°C; filament temperature, 1800°C; gas pressure, 5×103 Pa; gas flow rate, 52 seem except for the 0.1% CH4 :H2 ratio deposition in which the flow rate was 120 seem. Film thicknesses were determined from cross sectional SEM micrographs. The average growth rates on the mullite increased nearly linearly with increasing CH4 gas fraction, ranging from 0.05 μm/hr to 0.21 μm/hr. Growth rates on the Si substrates were slightly lower for identical growth conditions. Surface SEM micrographs revealed that the roughness of the films decreased with increasing CH4 gas fraction during deposition. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that crystalline grain size in the films decreased with increasing CH4 gas fraction. No preferred crystallographic orientation was seen in the diffraction patterns. Isolated particles were also grown on Si substrates under the same deposition conditions as the film growth. As the CH4 gas fraction increased, the particle growth displayed increasing rates of secondary particle nucleation resulting in a less well faceted morphology.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

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References

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Effects of Different CH4-H2 Gas Compositions on the Morphology and Growth of Diamond Grown by Hot Filament CVD
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