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Effects of Device Architecture on the Performance of Organic Thin Film Transistors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Xiaojing Zhou
Affiliation:
xiaojing.zhou@newcastle.edu.au, University of Newcastle, Centre for Organic Electronics, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
Karyn E. Mutkins
Affiliation:
Karyn.mutkins@studentmail.newcastle.edu.au, University of Newcastle, Centre for Organic Electronics, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
Daniel Elkington
Affiliation:
Daniel.Elkington@studentmail.newcastle.edu.au, University of Newcastle, Centre for Organic Electronics, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
Kathleen Sirois
Affiliation:
Kathleen.sirois@studentmail.newcastle.edu.au, University of Newcastle, Centre for Organic Electronics, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
Warwick Belcher
Affiliation:
Warwick.belcher@newcastle.edu.au, University of Newcastle, Centre for Organic Electronics, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
Paul Christopher Dastoor
Affiliation:
phpd@alinga.newcastle.edu.au, University of Newcastle, Centre for Organic Electronics, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
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Abstract

The impact of device dimension and architecture on the device performance of an all–solution fabrication organic thin film transistor (OTFT) has been investigated. The saturation drain current is inversely proportional to the channel length, indicating that a characteristic of field–effect like transistor has been obtained. In contrast, the drain current is independent of the thickness of polyvinylphenol (PVP) dielectric layer and a large leakage current is observed at the gate electrode indicating that the device also shows electrochemical transistor characteristics. Although separate conductance measurements of a single poly(3–hexylthiophene) (P3HT) layer and a P3HT/PVP layer reveal that the conductance is proportional to the thickness of the layer, the maximum achieved drain current in the fabricated OTFT is inversely proportional to the P3HT thickness. Using this data, an interface of P3HT/PVP or a maximum P3HT thickness for a working transistor of approximately 160 ± 16 nm can be extracted. The mechanism of operation of these devices is discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

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