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Effect of Thermal Processing Conditions on Ferroelectric PZT Thin Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 February 2011

Chi K. Kwok
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061.
Seshu B. Desu
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061.
Lee Kammerdiner
Affiliation:
Ramtron Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO 80918.
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Abstract

Ferroelectric and transparent lead–zirconate–titanate thin films were fabricated by rf sputtering. The substrates used were Pt–coated single crystal silicon. The deposition temperatures were relatively low (≅ 200°C). Annealing at high temperatures yielded first pyrochlore type and finally perovskite with good switching characteristics. The phase structure, microstructure, surface composition, and properties were measured as a function annealing time and temperature. In general, the Pb concentration on the surface decreased with increasing annealing temperature or time, whereas Zr concentration increased. It was observed that the grain size of perovskite PZT did not show any significant changes with increasing either anneal temperature or time.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

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References

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