Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-564cf476b6-z65vl Total loading time: 0.188 Render date: 2021-06-20T17:10:28.286Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Effect of Microcavity Structures on the Photoluminescence of Silicon Nanocrystals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Marc G. Spooner
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia.
Timothy M. Walsh
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia.
Robert G. Elliman
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia.
Get access

Abstract

ptical microcavity structures containing Si nanocrystals are fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) of SiO2, Si3N4 and SiOx layers. The nanocrystals are formed within Si-rich oxide layers (SiOx) by precipitation and growth, and the microcavity structures defined by two parallel distributed Bragg mirrors (DBM) made from either alternate SiO2/Si3N4 layers or alternate SiO2/SiOx layers. In the latter case, Si nanocrystal layers form part of the DBM structure thereby providing a distributed emission source. The optical emission from these and related structures are examined and compared with that from isolated nanocrystal layers.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1 Polman, A., Hoven, G. N. van den, Custer, J. S., Shin, J. H., Serna, R., and Alkemade, P. F. A., J. Appl. Phys. 1256, 1256 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2 Priolo, F., Franzo, G., Coffa, S., Polman, A., Bellani, V.,Carnera, A., and Spinella, C., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 397, 397 (1994).Google Scholar
3 McKinty, C. N., Kirkby, K. J., Homewood, K. P., Edwards, S. P., Shao, G., Valizadeh, R., and Colligon, J. S., Nucl. Instr. Meth. B 179, 179 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4 Ragan, R., Min, K. S., and A, H. A.. Mat. Sci. & Eng. B 204, 204 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5 Ng, W. L.., A, L. M.., M, G. R.., S, L.., G, S.., and P, H. K.., Nature 192, 192 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6 Canham, L. T., Appl. Phys. Lett. 1045, 1045 (1990).Google Scholar
7 Takagi, H., Ogawa, H., Yamazaki, Y., Ishizaki, A., and Nakagiri, T., Appl. Phys. Lett. 56, 2379 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8 Kovalev, D., KHeckler, H., Polisski, G., and Koch, F., Phys. Stat. Sol. B 871, 871 (1999).3.0.CO;2-9>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9 Chryssou, C. E., Kenyon, A. J., Iwayama, T. S., Pitt, C.W., and Hole, D. E., Appl. Phys. Lett. 2011, 2011 (1999).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10 Franzo, G., Pacifici, D., Vinciguerra, V., and Priolo, F., Appl. Phys. Lett. 2167, 2167 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11 Kik, P. G., Brongersma, M. L., and Polman, A., Appl. Phys. Lett. 2325, 2325 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12 Watanabe, K., Fujii, M., and Hayashi, S., J. Appl. Phys. 4761, 4761 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13 Pavesi, L. and Mulloni, V., J. Luminescence 45, 45 (1999).Google Scholar
14 Iacona, F., Fanzo, G., Moreira, E. C., Pacifici, D.,Irrera, A., and Priolo, F., Mat. Sci. Eng. C377, 377 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15 Iacona, F., Fanzo, G., Moreira, E. C., and Priolo, F., J. Appl. Phys. 8354, 8354 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16 Deenapanray, P. N. K. and Jagadish, C., Electrochem. Solid-State Lett. 4, G11 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17 Iacona, F., Franzo, G., and Spinella, C., J. Appl. Phys. 1295, 1295 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Effect of Microcavity Structures on the Photoluminescence of Silicon Nanocrystals
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Effect of Microcavity Structures on the Photoluminescence of Silicon Nanocrystals
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Effect of Microcavity Structures on the Photoluminescence of Silicon Nanocrystals
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *