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Effect of Curing Temperature on the Properties of Cementitious Waste Forms

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

Ryan O. Lokken
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest Laboratory Box 999, Richland, WA 99352
John W. Shade
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest Laboratory Box 999, Richland, WA 99352
Paul F. C. Martin
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest Laboratory Box 999, Richland, WA 99352
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Abstract

Current plans for disposing various low-level radioactive and/or hazardous liquid wastes include solidification of the waste using cementitious materials. One process, known as grouting, involves mixing liquid wastes with a blend of cementitious materials and pumping the resultant slurry to lined, underground concrete vaults. As the grout slurry begins to solidify and harden, the temperature within the grout increases due to exothermic hydration reactions. Depending on the the particular grout composition and on the disposal conditions, the grout may be exposed to temperatures of around 90°C for extended time periods. Studies are being conducted to determine the effects of high-temperature curing on selected properties of grouts prepared with a simulated low-level liquid waste. Grout samples cured at temperatures up to 950C in the laboratory absorbed water during curing. The resultant leach resistance and compressive strength of these grouts decreased with increases in curing temperature and curing time.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

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References

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