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The Effect of contamination solutions and substrate conditions on Copper Particle Growth Behavior

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Geun-Min Choi
Affiliation:
Memory R&D Division, Hyundai Electronics Industries Co., Ltd, San 136-1, Ami-Ri, Bubal-Eub, Ichon-Si, Kyoungki-Do, 467–701 Korea
Katsuyuki Sekijne
Affiliation:
Department of Electronics, Tohoku University, Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Sendai 980, Japan
Hiroshi Morita
Affiliation:
Department of Electronics, Tohoku University, Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Sendai 980, Japan
Tadahiro Ohmi
Affiliation:
Department of Electronics, Tohoku University, Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Sendai 980, Japan
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Abstract

Cu particle growth behavior on two silicon substrates, amorphous and single crystal silicon, has been investigated using two contamination solutions. This study reveals that the growth behavior of Cu particle depends on substrate conditions and copper contamination solutions. Contamination level is independent of split conditions. From the SEM images of an amorphous silicon shows a big difference in the number of particles depending on copper contamination solution. The amorphous silicon has similar native oxide thickness in ultrapure water spiked with CuF2 and CuCl2, whereas the single crystal silicon is different from the native oxide thickness depending on copper contamination solution. When 1 ppm of Cu in ultrapure water was spiked as a function of time, the amount of Cu impurity on amorphous silicon in the early dipping stage was measured 10 times higher than that on single crystal silicon for both of copper contamination solutions.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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References

REFERENCES

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