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Effect of Boron Doping on Microcrystalline Germanium Carbon Thin Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Yasutoshi YASHIKI
Affiliation:
yashiki.y.aa@m.titech.ac.jp, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physical Electronics, 2-12-1 S9-9 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8552, Japan
Seiichi KOUKETSU
Affiliation:
kouketsu@solid.pe.titech.ac.jp, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo, 152-8552, Japan
Shinsuke MIYAJIMA
Affiliation:
miyajima.s.aa@m.titech.ac.jp, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo, 152-8552, Japan
Akira YAMADA
Affiliation:
yamada.a.ac@m.titech.ac.jp, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Quantum Nanoelectronics Research Center, Tokyo, 152-8552, Japan
Makoto KONAGAI
Affiliation:
konagai.m.aa@m.titech.ac.jp, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo, 152-8552, Japan
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Abstract

Effects of boron doping on microcrystalline germanium carbon alloy (μc-Ge1-xCx:H) thin films have been investigated. We deposited boron-doped p-type μc-Ge1-xCx:H thin films by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition technique using hydrogen diluted monomethylgermane (MMG) and diborane (B2H6). A dark conductivity of 1.3 S/cm and carrier concentration of 1.7 x 1020 cm-3 were achieved with B2H6/MMG ratio of 0.1. Furthermore, the activation energy decreased from 0.37 to 0.037 eV with increasing B2H6/MMG ratio from 0 to 0.1. We also fabricated p-type μc-Ge1-xCx:H/n-type c-Si heterojunction diodes. The diodes showed rectifying characteristics. The typical ideality factor and rectifying ratio were 1.4 and 3.7 x 103 at ¡Ó 0.5 V, respectively.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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References

1 Herrold, J. T. and Dalal, V. L., “Growth and properties of microcrystalline germaniumcarbide alloys grown using electron cyclotron resonance plasma processing”, Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids 270 (2000) 255.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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3 Yashiki, Yasutoshi, Miyajima, Shinsuke, Yamada, Akira, and Konagai, Makoto, “Deposition and characterization of µc-Ge1-xCx thin films grown by hot-wire chemical deposition using organo-germane”, Thin Solid Films 501 (2006) 202.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4 Yashiki, Yasutoshi, Kouketsu, Seiichi, Miyajima, Shinsuke, Yamada, Akira, and Konagai, Makoto “Growth and Characterization of Germanium Carbon Thin Films Deposited by VHF Plasma CVD Technique”, Proc. 2006 IEEE 4th World Conference on Photovoltaic Energy Conversion (2006) 1608.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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6 Dalal, Vikram L. and Herrold, Jason T., “Microcrystalline Germanium Carbide-A new material for PV conversion”, Presented at 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting (2001) 348.Google Scholar

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