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Dynamic Behaviour of Lead Nanoparticles in A Dielectric Matrix

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

P. Cheyssac
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, URA 190, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, 06108 Nice Cedex 2, France
R. Kofman
Affiliation:
Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, URA 190, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, 06108 Nice Cedex 2, France
P. G. Merli
Affiliation:
Istituto di Chimica e Tecnologie dei Materiali e dei Componenti dell′ Elettronica del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via di Castagnoli 1, I- 40126 Bologna, Italy
A. Migliori
Affiliation:
Istituto di Chimica e Tecnologie dei Materiali e dei Componenti dell′ Elettronica del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via di Castagnoli 1, I- 40126 Bologna, Italy
A. Stella
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Fisica A. Volta, Università degli Studi di Pavia, Via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia, Italy
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Abstract

In this paper we present electron microscopy results near and below the melting temperature, both in dark field and high resolution mode, of lead nanoparticles embedded in a dielectric matrix of amorphous SiOx. Three different size dependent regimes are distinguished. Indications of solid particles rotations as well as of a new phenomenon amenable to spontaneous solid-liquid phase fluctuations will be briefly discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

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References

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