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Dislocation Models for Strengthening in Nanostructured Metallic Multilayers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 March 2011

A. Misra
Affiliation:
MST Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS K765, Los Alamos, NM 87545
J. P. Hirth
Affiliation:
MST Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS K765, Los Alamos, NM 87545
H. Kung
Affiliation:
MST Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS K765, Los Alamos, NM 87545
R. G. Hoagland
Affiliation:
MST Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS K765, Los Alamos, NM 87545
J. D. Embury
Affiliation:
MST Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS K765, Los Alamos, NM 87545
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Abstract

Ultra-high strength metallic multilayers are ideal for investigating the effects of length scales in plastic deformation of metallic materials. Experiments on model systems show that the strengths of these materials increase with decreasing bilayer period following the Hall-Petch model. However, as the layer thickness is reduced to the nm-scale, the number of dislocations in the pile-up approaches one and the pile-up based Hall-Petch model ceases to apply. For nm-scale semi-coherent multilayers, we hypothesize that plastic flow occurs by the motion of single dislocation loops, initially in the softer layer, that deposit misfit type dislocation arrays at the interface and transfer load to the harder phase. The stress concentration eventually leads to slip in the harder phase, overcoming the resistance from the misfit arrays at the interface. A model is developed within the framework of classical dislocation theory to estimate the strengthening from this mechanism. The model predictions are compared with experimentally measured strengths.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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