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Diffusivity of Si in the 3C-SiC Buffer Layer on Si(100) by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Wei-Yu Chen
Affiliation:
m7038ms32@hotmail.com, National Tsing Hua University, Materials Science and Engineering, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Province of China
Jian-You Lin
Affiliation:
j.y.lin@hotmail.com, National Tsing Hua University, Materials Science and Engineering, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Taiwan, Province of China
Jenn-Chang Hwang
Affiliation:
Jch@mx.nthu.edu.tw, National Tsing Hua University, Materials Science and Engineering, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Taiwan, Province of China
Chih-Fang Huang
Affiliation:
cfhuang@ee.nthu.edu.tw, National Tsing Hua University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Taiwan, Province of China
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Abstract

A void free 3C-SiC film grown on Si(100) can be achieved by low pressure chemical vapor deposition using the modified four-step method. The diffusion step plays an important role to enhance the quality of the 3C-SiC buffer layer on Si(100). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the bonding characteristics of the 3C-SiC buffer layer of about 10 nm thick. The Si-C bonds are partially formed on the as-carburized Si(100) before the diffusion step. The ratio of C-C to Si-C bonds on the as-carburized Si(100) is about 7:3, which can be lowered to about 1:9 after the diffusion step at 1350 oC for 5 min or at 1300 oC for 7 min. According to XPS data and Fick's second law, the diffusivity of Si across the 3C-SiC interlayer are determined to be 2.2×10-16 cm2/s and 3.13×10-16 cm2/s at 1300°C and 1350°C, respectively. The derived activation energy is 1.6 eV for the diffusion of Si atoms in the 3C-SiC buffer layer.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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