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Diamond Surface Modifications with Diazonium Salt

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Hiroshi Uetsuka
Affiliation:
hiroshi.uetsuka@aist.go.jp, Diamond Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 2, 1-1-1, Umezono, Tsukuba, 305-8568, Japan
Dongchan Shin
Affiliation:
dongchan.shin@aist.go.jp, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, 305-8568, Japan
Norio Tokuda
Affiliation:
n-tokuda@aist.go.jp, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, 305-8568, Japan
Kazuhiko Saeki
Affiliation:
kazuhiko-saeki@aist.go.jp, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, 305-8568, Japan
Christoph E. Nebel
Affiliation:
christoph.nebel@aist.go.jp, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, 305-8568, Japan
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Abstract

The growth of covalently bonded nitrophenyl layers on atomically smooth boron-doped single crystalline diamond surfaces is characterized, using cyclic voltammetric attachment and constant potential grafting by electrochemical reduction of aryl diazonium salts. We apply atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize nitrophenyl layer-growth and thickness. Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is applied to reveal bonding arrangement of phenyl molecules and transient current measurements during the grafting is used to investigate the dynamics of chemical bonding. Nitrophenyl groups at an initial stage of attachment grown three-dimensional forming layers with varying heights and densities. Layer thicknesses of up to 80 Å are detected for cyclic voltammetry attachment after 5 cycles, whereas the layer becomes denser and only about 25 Å thick in case of constant potential attachment. No monomolecular closed layer could be detected. The data are discussed taking into account established growth models.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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