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Development of Zinc Phosphide as an Absorber Using Chemical Reflux Technique.

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 July 2012

Siva P Adusumilli
Affiliation:
Center for Autonomous Solar Power, State University of New york at Binghamton, Binghamton, New york 13902, U.S.A.
Parag Vasekar
Affiliation:
Center for Autonomous Solar Power, State University of New york at Binghamton, Binghamton, New york 13902, U.S.A.
Daniel VanHart
Affiliation:
Center for Autonomous Solar Power, State University of New york at Binghamton, Binghamton, New york 13902, U.S.A.
Tara Dhakal
Affiliation:
Center for Autonomous Solar Power, State University of New york at Binghamton, Binghamton, New york 13902, U.S.A.
Charles R. Westgate
Affiliation:
Center for Autonomous Solar Power, State University of New york at Binghamton, Binghamton, New york 13902, U.S.A.
Seshu Desu
Affiliation:
Formerly at the State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902, USA
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Abstract

Recent trend in thin film solar cells is to use earth abundant materials such as zinc and iron. Zinc phosphide (Zn3P2) has been has been explored as a choice for solar cell absorber and is currently reviving attention. Zinc phosphide is synthesized from earth-abundant constituents. We have already optimized zinc phosphide phase both in nanocrystalline and bulk thin film form. The purpose of this study is to study growth conditions at different temperatures. In this study, Trioctylphosphine (TOP) is used as a source of phosphorous which reacts with zinc and results in the growth of Zn3P2. The synthesized zinc phosphide phase has been characterized using SEM, EDS, XRD and XPS. We report a simple and repeatable process for synthesis of Zn3P2 phase.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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References

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