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Densification of Inert Matrix Fuels Using Naturally-occurring Material as a Sintering Additive

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Shuhei Miwa
Affiliation:
miwa.shuhei@jaea.go.jp, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Higashi-Ibaraki-gun, Japan
Masahiko Osaka
Affiliation:
ohsaka.masahiko@jaea.go.jp, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Higashi-Ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki, Japan
Toshiyuki Usuki
Affiliation:
usuki.t.aa@m.titech.ac.jp, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Toyohiko Yano
Affiliation:
tyano@nr.titech.ac.jp, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, Japan
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Abstract

We proposed a new concept for densification of inert matrix fuels containing minor actinides. In this concept, magnesium silicates which are both a naturally-occurring material and asbestos waste were used as a sintering additive which protects public health by safely disposing of the asbestos waste. In this study, the effects of magnesium silicate additives on the densification behaviors of MgO, Mo and CeO2 were experimentally investigated. The densities of MgO and CeO2 pellets increased with only 1 wt.% additives of MgSiO3 and Mg2SiO4. The densities of Mo pellets showed little change with additives.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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References

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