Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-65dc7cd545-nrv4r Total loading time: 0.211 Render date: 2021-07-25T20:26:01.512Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Demonstration of biocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotubes with blood leukocytes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 March 2012

Krishnakiran Medepalli
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Speed School of Engineering, Louisville, KY
Bruce Alphenaar
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Speed School of Engineering, Louisville, KY
Ashok Raj
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Louisville, KY
Palaniappan Sethu
Affiliation:
Department of Bioengineering, Speed School of Engineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
Get access

Abstract

Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess unique structural and functional properties. Their ability to be functionalized with different biomolecules makes them excellent candidates for biomedical applications like targeted drug delivery and cancer diagnostics. However, prior to use in therapeutic applications, biocompatibility of SWNTs needs to be thoroughly investigated. Blood is a living tissue and contains cells which can potentially interact with SWNTs during the drug delivery process. The interaction of leukocytes in blood with the SWNTs can provide information regarding the immune response of the host to the nanotubes. Here, we evaluated the acute immune response of leukocytes in blood to SWNTs via (a) direct interaction, due to the presence of SWNTs in circulation and (b) indirect interaction, due to the presentation of SWNTs to leukocytes via antigen presenting cells. These SWNTs were non-covalently functionalized with single stranded DNA (ss-DNA) that acts as a surfactant for suspending SWNTs in aqueous solutions and also serves as a backbone for attaching and transporting different biomolecules. Isolation of cells from blood was done using density gradient centrifugation. Early activation markers were used to study the activation of different leukocyte subpopulations and any activation results in changes of these markers. Flow cytometry was done to analyze the different subpopulations. Results of our study demonstrated that ss-DNA functionalized SWNTs do not elicit an immune response from leukocytes in blood via direct or indirect interaction. This intensive study demonstrates the biocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotubes and paves the way for their safe use in drug delivery and cancer therapeutics without cytotoxicity.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Nie, S., Xing, Y., Kim, G. J. and Simons, J. W., Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering, 9(1), 257, (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Klumpp, C., Kostarelos, K., Prato, M. and Bianco, A.. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Biomembranes, 1758(3), 404 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Hu, H., Ni, Y., Montana, V., Haddon, R. C. and Parpura, V.. Nano Letters, 4(3), 507 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Teker, K., Sirdeshmukh, R., Sivakumar, K., Lu, S., Wickstrom, E. and Wang, H.N., et al. . Nanobiotechnology, 1(2), 171, (2005).Google Scholar
5. Wong Shi Kam, N. and Dai, H., Phys Status Solidi B Basic Res, 243, 3561, (2006),CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Cherukuri, P., Bachilo, S.M., Litovsky, S.H. and Weisman, R.B., J Am Chem Soc, 126, 15638, (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Monteiro-Riviere, N.A., Nemanich, R.J., Inman, A.O., Wang, Y.Y. and Riviere, J.E., Toxicol Lett, 155, 377, (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Pulskamp, K., Diabaté, S. and Krug, H.F., Toxicol Lett, 168, 58, (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Davoren, M., Herzog, E., Casey, A., Cottineau, B., Chambers, G. and Byrne, H.J, et al. ., Toxicol In Vitro, 21, 438, (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Dumortier, H., Lacotte, S., Pastorin, G., Marega, R., Wu, W. and Bonifazi, D., et al. ., Nano Lett, 6, 1522, (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Bai, , , Y. Zhang, , , J. Zhang, , , Q. Mu, , , W. Zhang, and Butch, E.R., et al. ., Nat Nano, 5, 683, (2010) [10.1038/nnano.2010.153]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Muller, J., Huaux, F., Moreau, N., Misson, P., Heilier, J.F. and Delos, M., et al. ., Toxicol Appl Pharmacol, 207, 221, (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13. Zhou, L.J. and Tedder, T.F.., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 93, 2588 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Sethu, P., Moldawer, L.L., Mindrinos, M.N., Scumpia, P.O., Tannahill, C.L. and Wilhelmy, J., et al. ., Anal Chem, 78, 5423, (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15. Russom, A., Sethu, P., Irimia, D., Mindrinos, M.N., Calvano, S.E. and Garcia, I., et al. ., Clin Chem, 54, 891, (2008).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16. Gea, Cuicui, Dua, Jiangfeng, Zhaoa, Lina, Wanga, Liming, Liua, Ying, Lia, Denghua, Yanga, Yanlian, Zhoub, Ruhong, Zhaoa, Yuliang, Chaid, Zhifang, and Chena, Chunying, PNAS, 108(41),(2011).Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Demonstration of biocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotubes with blood leukocytes
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Demonstration of biocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotubes with blood leukocytes
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Demonstration of biocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotubes with blood leukocytes
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *