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Deformation Mechanisms in Be12X Compounds

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 1992

S. Sondhi
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352
R. G. Hoagland
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352
J. P. Hirth
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352
J. L. Brimhall
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2920.
L. A. Charlot
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2920.
S. M. Bruemmer
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2920.
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Abstract

Dislocation structures have been examined, and active slip systems identified, in Be12Nb after compressive deformation at 20, 800, 900,1000 and 1200°C. A large number of slip systems are active at 1200°C, but these decrease significantly at temperatures below 1000°C. Dislocation structures at low temperatures are limited to 1/2<101]{101) partial dislocations either paired or creating isolated planar faults. Significant ductility is not observed until 1200°C when a second type of partial dislocation, 1/2<100]{011) is present. Dislocations observed in the body-centered tetragonal Be12X compounds (where X can be Nb, Ta, Mo, V, Fe etc.) have been modelled atomistically using molecular dynamics. Simulations corroborate the stability of these dislocation systems and indicate that the stacking faults associated with these partial dislocations have very low fault energy.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

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References

1) Lewis, J. R., Metals, J., 13 829 (1961).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2) Stonehouse, A. J., Paine, R. M. and Beaver, W. W., Mechanical Properties of Some Transition Element Beryllides. edited by Westbrook, J. H., (, John Wiley, 1960) p. 297.Google Scholar
3) Bruemmer, S. M., Charlot, L. A., Brimhall, J. L., Henager, C. H. Jr. and Hirth, J. P., Phil. Mag. A, 65 1083 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4) Kronberg, M. L., Acta Metall., 9 327 (1961).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5) Bruemmer, S. M., Arey, B. W., Jacobson, R. E. and Henager, C. H. Jr. High-Temperature Ordered Intermetallic Alloys IV (Mater. Res. Soc. Proc. 213, 1991) p. 475.Google Scholar
6) Sondhi, S., Hoagland, R. G. and Hirth, J. P., Mat. Sci. & Engg., A152 103 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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