Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-rtmr9 Total loading time: 0.194 Render date: 2021-06-13T17:11:59.086Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Defects Induced by Helium Implantation: Impact on Boron Diffusivity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

F. Cayrel
Affiliation:
Universitéde Tours, L.M.P, 16, rue Pierre et Marie Curie, B.P. 7155, F37071 TOURS Cedex, France
D. Alquier
Affiliation:
Universitéde Tours, L.M.P, 16, rue Pierre et Marie Curie, B.P. 7155, F37071 TOURS Cedex, France
C. Dubois
Affiliation:
L.P.M. - INSA Lyon, 20 rue A. Einstein, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex, France.
R. Jerisian
Affiliation:
Universitéde Tours, L.M.P, 16, rue Pierre et Marie Curie, B.P. 7155, F37071 TOURS Cedex, France
Get access

Abstract

High dose helium implantation followed by a suitable thermal treatment induces defects such as cavities and dislocations. Gettering efficiency of this technique for metallic impurities has been widely proved. Nevertheless, dopants, as well as point defects, interact with this defect layer. Due to the presence of vacancy type defects after helium implantation, boron diffusion can be largely influenced by such a buried layer. In this paper, we study the influence of helium induced defects on boron diffusion. The boron diffusion in presence of these defects has been analyzed as a function of different parameters such as distance between boron profile and defect layer and defect density. Our results demonstrate that the major impact known as boron enhanced diffusion can be partially or completely suppressed depending on parameters of experiments. Moreover, these results clarify the interaction of boron with extended He-induced defects.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1 Hugo, S.A. Mc and Hielsmair, H., in Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Vol 8, Ed. Webster, J.G., Wiley-Interscience Publication, 388 (1998).Google Scholar
2 Kang, J.S. and Schroder, D.K., J. Appl. Phys. 65 (8), 2974 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3 Perichaud, I., Yakimov, E., Martinuzzi, S. and Dubois, C., J. Appl. Phys. (90) 6, 2806 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4 Roqueta, F., Grob, A., Grob, J.J., Dubois, C., Fauré, J. and Ventura, L., Solid State Phenom., Vols 69-70, 241 (1999).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5 Myers, S.M., Seibt, M., Schoter, W., J. Appl. Phys. 88, 3795 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6 Cayrel, F., Alquier, D., Ventura, L., Vincent, L., Roqueta, F., Dubois, C. and Jerisian, R., Solid State Phenom. Vol. 95-96, 297306 (2004).Google Scholar
7 Cayrel, F., Alquier, D., Mathiot, D., Ventura, L., Roqueta, F., Gaudin, G. and Jérisian, R., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 216, 291296 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8 Raineri, V., Saggio, M. and Rimini, E., J. Mater. Res., Vol. 15, N°. 7, 14491477 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9 Wong-Leung, J., Williams, J.S. and Petravic, M., Appl. Phys. Lett., Vol. 72, N°. 19, 24182420 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10 Wang, S. and Zhu, P., Mater. Sci. Eng. B72, 142145 (2000).Google Scholar
11 Pichler, P., Jungling, W., Selberherr, S., Guerrero, E., Pötzl, H.W., IEEE Trans. Computer-Aided Design 4, 384 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12 Ural, A., Griffin, P.B., Plummer, J.D., J. Appl. Phys. 85, 6440 (1999).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13 Jain, S.C., Schoenmaker, W., Lindsay, R., Stolk, P.A., Decoutere, S., Willander, M., Maes, H.E., J. Appl. Phys. 91, 8919 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14 Claverie, A., Colombeau, B., Cristiano, F., Altibelli, A. and Bonafos, C., Nuc. Instr. And Meth. In Phys. Res. B 186, 281286 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15 Follstaedt, D.M., Myers, S.M. and Stein, H.J., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol.279, 105 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Defects Induced by Helium Implantation: Impact on Boron Diffusivity
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Defects Induced by Helium Implantation: Impact on Boron Diffusivity
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Defects Induced by Helium Implantation: Impact on Boron Diffusivity
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *