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Damage in Composite Materials: Experiment Vs a Computational Chaotic Model

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

Franco Meloni
Affiliation:
Physics Department, University of Cagliari, Italy C.M.T.A. Materials Centre for Advanced Technologies, University of Cagliari, Italy
Alberto Varone
Affiliation:
Physics Department, University of Cagliari, Italy C.M.T.A. Materials Centre for Advanced Technologies, University of Cagliari, Italy
Francesco Ginesu
Affiliation:
Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Cagliari, Italy C.M.T.A. Materials Centre for Advanced Technologies, University of Cagliari, Italy
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Abstract

We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical study performed using non-linear mechanics schemes to investigate the structural behaviour of a composite macroscopic material. A simple model is considered to define the order of the complexity of the real system represented by a graphite peek polymer under static and dynamic load In particular a relationship has been found between the critical points in the energy-time diagram and in the bifurcation plot.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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