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Cubic SiC the Forgotten Polytype

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

H. N. Jayatirtha
Affiliation:
Materials Science Research Center of Excellence School of Engineering, Howard University, 2300 6th St. NW. Washington DC, 20059
M. G. Spencer
Affiliation:
Materials Science Research Center of Excellence School of Engineering, Howard University, 2300 6th St. NW. Washington DC, 20059
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Abstract

The two most common and most studied forms of SiC are 6H-SiC and 3C-SiC. The 3C-SiC, or cubic modification shares the zincblend lattice structure with other well developed semiconductor materials, such as GaAs and InP. We have grown thick 3C-SiC by the sublimation method. Our results show that it is possible to maintain the 3C polytype even at growth temperatures of 2000°C. Using the sublimation technique we have obtained growth rates as high as 130 microns/hr.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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