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Crystallization-induced Stress in Phase Change Random Access Memory

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Minghua Li
Affiliation:
li_minghua@dsi.a-star.edu.sg, Data Storage Institute, A*STAR (Agency for Science, technology and Research), Singapore, Singapore
Jianming Li
Affiliation:
li_jianming@dsi.a-star.edu.sg, Data Storage Institute, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Singapore, Singapore
Luping Shi
Affiliation:
shi_luping@dsi.a-star.edu.sg, Data Storage Institute, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Singapore, Singapore
Hongxin Yang
Affiliation:
yang_hongxin@dsi.a-star.edu.sg, Data Storage Institute, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Singapore, Singapore
Tow Chong Chong
Affiliation:
chong_tow_chong@dsi.a-star.edu.sg, Data Storage Institute, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Singapore, Singapore
Yi Li
Affiliation:
mseliy@nus.edu.sg, National University of Singapore, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Singapore, Singapore
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Abstract

Switched phase change material in Phase Change Random Access Memory (PCRAM) is confined within a solid surrounding. As a result of mechanical properties and microstructure differences between the crystalline and the amorphous phases, strains and stresses are generated and may degrade the performance of PCRAM devices. This paper investigated the crystallization-induced stress in phase change Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) nano film. The electric-thermal and thermo-mechanical simulation results show that the increases of both of the Young's modulus and Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) are responsible for the stress generation upon crystallization. The XRD studies correlate the strains and stresses with the lattice deformation in crystalline GST films.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

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