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Correlation of Laboratory Results with Observations on Long-Term Corrosion of Iron and Copper Alloys

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2011

M. B. McNeil
Affiliation:
Naval Coastal Systems Center, Panama City, FL 32407-5000
D. W. Mohr
Affiliation:
Naval Coastal Systems Center, Panama City, FL 32407-5000
B. J. Little
Affiliation:
Naval Oceanographic and Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Flight Center, MS 39529
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Abstract

The data base for compounds produced during long-term corrosion of iron and copper objects is reviewed. Compounds are identified that occur in long-term but not in short-term corrosion. Where possible, the formation of these compounds is explained or at least rationalized. An effort is made to discriminate those compounds whose formation depends on microbiological action from those forming abiotically.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

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Correlation of Laboratory Results with Observations on Long-Term Corrosion of Iron and Copper Alloys
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