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Correlation Between Oxygen Composition and Electrical Properties in NiO Thin Films for Resistive Random Access Memory

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Yusuke Nishi
Affiliation:
nishi@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Tatsuya Iwata
Affiliation:
iwata@semicon.kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Tsunenobu Kimoto
Affiliation:
kimoto@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
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Abstract

Admittance spectroscopy measurement has been performed on NiOx thin films with various oxygen compositions (x=1.0-1.2) in order to characterize localized defect levels. The activation energy and concentration of localized defect levels in NiOx films with low oxygen composition (x≤1.07) are 120-170 meV and lower than 2×1019 cm-3, respectively. From I-V measurement of the Pt/NiOx/Pt structures, samples with high oxygen composition (x≥1.10) did not show resistance switching operation, while samples with low oxygen composition (x≤1.07) did. The best oxygen composition of NiOx thin films turned out to be 1.07 in order to realize repeatable and stable resistance switching operation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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Correlation Between Oxygen Composition and Electrical Properties in NiO Thin Films for Resistive Random Access Memory
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