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Copper Phthalocyanine Single-crystal Field-effect Transistors Stable Above 100°C

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Koichi Yamada
Affiliation:
koichi@criepi.denken.or.jp, CRIEPI, 1Materials Science Research Laboratory, 2-11-1, Iwado Kita, Komae, Tokyo, 201-8511, Japan
Jun Takeya
Affiliation:
takeya@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp, Osaka University, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, N/A, 560-0043, Japan
Kunji Shigeto
Affiliation:
kshigeto@riken.jp, RIKEN, Hirosawa, Wako, N/A, 351-0198, Japan
Kazuhito Tsukagoshi
Affiliation:
tsuka@riken.jp, RIKEN, Hirosawa, Wako, N/A, 351-0198, Japan
Yoshinobu Aoyagi
Affiliation:
aoyagi@riken.jp, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, N/A, 336-8502, Japan
Yoshihiro Iwasa
Affiliation:
iwasa@imr.tohoku.ac.jp, Institute for Material Reasearch, Tohoku University, Sendai, N/A, 980-8577, Japan
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Abstract

Intrinsic charge transport of copper phthalocyanine single-crystal field-effect transistors is measured as function of temperature up to above 100°C. The conduction of the accumulated carriers shows hopping-type transport, so that the field-effect mobility increases with temperature following activation-type temperature dependence throughout the measured temperature region. Due to excellent material stability at the high temperature, the mobility values are precisely reproduced after the heat cycles.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2006

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References

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