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Convenient Molecular Approach of Size and Shape Controlled ZnSe and ZnTe Nanocrystals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2011

Young-wook Jun
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and School of Molecular Science – BK21, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Taejon 305-701, Korea
Jong-Il Park
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and School of Molecular Science – BK21, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Taejon 305-701, Korea
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Abstract

Our study describes a convenient one-step synthesis of ZnSe and ZnTe nanocrystals (NC) whose sizes and shapes are precisely tuned by varing the growth temperature or stabilizing surfactants. We utilized molecular precursors, bis(phenylselenolate or phenyltellurolato)zinc -N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA), which effectively produce 0-dimensional sphere or 1-dimensional nanorods of ZnSe or ZnTe, respectively. Nanocrystals are highly monodispersed and luminescent; the emission wavelength varies over a wide range depending on the particle size. This study constitutes a nice demonstration of direct size and shape controlled synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals and this method can be extended to the synthesis of nanocrystals of other materials.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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