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Controlled Impurity Introduction In CVD: Chemical, Electrical, and Morphological Influences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

T. F. Kuech
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin, Department of Chemical Engineering, 1415 Johnson Drive, Madison, WI 53706
J. M. Redwing
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin, Department of Chemical Engineering, 1415 Johnson Drive, Madison, WI 53706
J.-W. Huang
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin, Department of Chemical Engineering, 1415 Johnson Drive, Madison, WI 53706
S. Nayak
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin, Materials Science Program, 1415 Johnson Drive, Madison, WI 53706
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Abstract

We present here an overview of recent studies of the influence of oxygen doping on the electrical and structural properties of semiconductors grown through the metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) technique. In particular, we have measured the impact of oxygen introduction on several of the principal aspects of the growth process: incorporation, activation, and influence on the growing surface structure. The gas phase chemistry and dopant incorporation was investigated for two different precursors: dimethyl aluminum methoxide and diethyl aluminum ethoxide. The simple change in the structure of the oxygen source leads to significant changes in the oxygen incorporation behavior. Complementary studies of the gas phase decomposition of these oxygen sources have indicated that the decomposition mechanism is substantially different for these two sources leading to the change in incorporation behavior. The impact of the selective incorporation of oxygen at heterointerfaces has been studied here through the growth of superlattice structures. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy measurements have shown that the incorporation of oxygen at the GaAs-to-AlxGaI-x As interface leads to modest increases in the average roughness of the heterointerface with more significant changes in the interfacial structure. The structure of this interfacial roughness was also studied through measurements of the diffuse X-ray scattering about a Bragg peak. Measurements of the component of the roughness which is correlated between the superlattice layers show significant changes with oxygen addition.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

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References

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