Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-6mft8 Total loading time: 0.255 Render date: 2021-10-20T07:31:55.139Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Conductive Tungsten-Based Layers Synthesized by Ion Implantation into 6H-Silicon Carbide

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 September 2012

H. Weishart
Affiliation:
Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., Institut fiir Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Postfach 510119, D-01314 Dresden, Germany
J. Schoneich
Affiliation:
Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., Institut fiir Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Postfach 510119, D-01314 Dresden, Germany
M. Voelskow
Affiliation:
Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., Institut fiir Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Postfach 510119, D-01314 Dresden, Germany
W. Skorupa
Affiliation:
Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., Institut fiir Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Postfach 510119, D-01314 Dresden, Germany
Get access

Abstract

We studied high dose implantation of tungsten into 6H-silicon carbide in order to synthesize an electrically conductive layer. Implantation was performed at 200 keV with a dose of 1.2x 1017 WIcm 2 at temperatures between 200°C and 400°C. The influence of implantation temperature on the distribution of W in SiC was investigated and compared to results obtained earlier from room temperature (RT) and 500°C implants. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) was employed to study the structure and composition of the implanted layers. Implantation at temperatures between RT and 300°C did not influence the depth distribution of C, Si and W. The W depth profile shows a conventional Gaussian shape. Implanting at higher temperatures led to a more confined W rich layer in the SiC. This confinement is explained by Ostwald ripening which is enabled during implantation at temperatures above 300°C. The depth of the implantation induced damage decreases slightly with increasing implantation temperature, except for 400°C implantation. The amount of damage, however, is significantly reduced only for implantation at 500°C.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Nelson, W.E., Halden, F.A. and Rosengreen, A., J. Appl. Phys. 37, 333 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Pensl, G. and Helbig, R., Festkörperprobleme/Advances in Solid State Physics 30, 133 (1990).Google Scholar
3. Petit, J.B. and Zeller, M.V. in Wide Band Gap Semiconductors, edited by T.D., Moustaka, J.I., Pankove, and Y., Hamakawa (Mater. Res. Soc. Proc. 242, Pittsburgh, PA, 1992) pp. 567572.Google Scholar
4. Glass, R.C., Spellman, L.M., and Davis, R.F., Appl. Phys. Lett. 59, 2868 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Anikin, M.M., Rastegaeva, M.R., Syrkin, A.L., and Chuiko, I.V., Springer Proceedings in Physics 56, 183 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Crofton, J., Ferrero, J.M., Barnes, P.A., Williams, J. R., Bozack, M.J., Tin, C. C., Ellis, C.D., Spitznagel, J.A. and McMullin, P.G., Springer Proceedings in Physics 71, 176 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Dmitriev, V.A., Irvine, K., Spencer, M., and Kelner, G., Appl. Phys. Lett. 64, 318 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Chaddha, A.K., Parsons, J.D., and Kruaval, G.B., Appl. Phys. Lett. 66, 760 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Uemoto, T., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 34, L7 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Crofton, J., McMullin, P.G., Williams, J. R., and Bozack, M.J., J. Appl. Phys. 77, 1317 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Baud, L., Jaussaud, C., Madar, R., Bernard, C., Chen, J.S., and Nicolet, M.A., Mat. Sci. Eng. B29, 126 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Zhang, H., PhD thesis, Friedrich Alexander Universität Erlangen, 1990.Google Scholar
13. Geib, K.M., Wilson, C., Long, R.G., and Wilmsen, C.W., J. Appl. Phys. 68, 2796 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Jacob, C., Nishino, S., Mehregany, M., and Pirouz, P., in Silicon Carbide and Related Materials (Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol and Philadelphia, 1994) ch.3 p.247.Google Scholar
15. Weishart, H., Schoneich, J., Steffen, H.-J., Matz, W., and Skorupa, W. in Beam-Solid Interactions for Materials Synthesis and Characterization, edited by D.E., Luzzi, T.F., Heinz, M., Iwaki, and D.C., Jacobson (Mater. Res. Soc. Proc. 354, Pittsburgh, PA, 1995) pp. 177182; Nucl. Instr. Meth. B12, 338 (1996).Google Scholar
16. Weishart, H., Matz, W., and Skorupa, W. in III-Nitride SiC, and Diamond Materials for Electronic Devices, edited by D.K., Gaskill, C., Brandt, and R.J., Nemanich (Mater. Res. Soc. Proc. 423, Pittsburgh, PA, 1997) pp..Google Scholar
17. Vardiman, R.G., Materials Science and Engineering A177, 209 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18. Doolittle, L.R., Nucl. Inst. Meth. B9, 334 (1985).Google Scholar
19. Heindl, J., Strunk, H.P., Heft, A., Bachmann, T., Glaser, E., Wendler, E. and Wesch, W., Inst. Phys. Conf. Ser. No 146, 435 (1995).Google Scholar
20. Wesch, W., Heft, A., Wendler, E., Bachmann, T. and Glaser, E., Nuc. Instr. Meth. B96, 335–38 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21. White, A.E., Short, K.T., Dynes, R.C., Gibson, J.M. and Hull, R., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 107, 3 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Conductive Tungsten-Based Layers Synthesized by Ion Implantation into 6H-Silicon Carbide
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Conductive Tungsten-Based Layers Synthesized by Ion Implantation into 6H-Silicon Carbide
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Conductive Tungsten-Based Layers Synthesized by Ion Implantation into 6H-Silicon Carbide
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *