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Color Switchable Goggle Lens Based on Electrochromic Polymer Devices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Chao Ma
Affiliation:
machao@u.washington.edu, University of Washington, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seattle, Washington, United States
Chunye Xu
Affiliation:
chunye@u.washington.edu, University of Washington, Mechanical Engineering Department, Seattle, Washington, United States
Corresponding
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Abstract

We have developed a set of new electrochromic devices (ECDs) for special application goggles, whose color can be switched between transparent and a specific color mode, i.e. blue (B). This paper will discuss the design, film deposition, device assembly and characterizations of the color switchable lens. The ECD is composed of a layer of thin film conducting polymer poly (3,4-(2,2-dimethylpropylenedioxy)thiophene) (PProDOT-Me2), a layer of thin film inorganic oxide V2O5-TiO2, and a layer of ionic conductive electrolyte. The thin films are electrochemically deposited on ITO coated flexible plastic substrate. The whole device is packaged with an UV cured flexible film sealant. The goggle lens exhibit tuneable shade in visible light wave length (380-800nm), with a maximum contrast ratio at 580nm. Meanwhile, other unique properties include fast switching speed, low driving voltage, memory function (no power needed after switching, bistable), great durability, high flexibility, light weight, and inexpensiveness.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

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