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Colloidal Preparation of γ-Fe2O3@Au [core@shell] Nanoparticles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Jiye Fang
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and AMRI, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148
Jibao He
Affiliation:
Coordinated Instrument Facility, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118
Eun Young Shin
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University, Seoul, 120-749 Korea
Deborah Grimm
Affiliation:
Coordinated Instrument Facility, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118
Charles J. O'Connor
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and AMRI, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148
Moo-Jin Jun
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University, Seoul, 120-749 Korea
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Abstract

γ-Fe2O3@Au core-shell nanoparticles were prepared through a combined route, in which high temperature organic solution synthesis and colloidal microemulsion techniques were successively applied. High magnification of TEM reveals the core-shell structure. The presence of Au on the surface of as-prepared particles is also confirmed by UV-Vis absorption. The magnetic core-shell nanoparticles offer a promising application in bio- and medical systems.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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References

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10.This molar percentage based on the determination from EDS is only for a relative comparison. It may not be the real composition value in core-shell particles as we assume that Au may partially self-aggregate intra-particles.Google Scholar

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Colloidal Preparation of γ-Fe2O3@Au [core@shell] Nanoparticles
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