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Cleaning during Initial Stages of Epitaxial Growth in an Ultrahigh Vacuum Rapid Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactor

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

Mahesh K. Sanganeria
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Box 7911, Raleigh, NC 27695–7911
Katherine E. Violette
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Box 7911, Raleigh, NC 27695–7911
Mehmet C. ÖZtÜRk
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Box 7911, Raleigh, NC 27695–7911
Gari Harris
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Box 7907, Raleigh, NC 27695–7907
C. Archie Lee
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Box 7907, Raleigh, NC 27695–7907
Dennis. M. Maher
Affiliation:
North Carolina State University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Box 7907, Raleigh, NC 27695–7907
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Abstract

In this paper, we report our results on surface preparation for the growth of epitaxial Si films. Hydrogen passivated surfaces are currently being investigated for application in Si epitaxy to eliminate the high temperature in-situ bake necessary to remove the native oxide. Hydrogen passivation is obtained by a dilute HF dip before the substrate is loaded in the process chamber. However the passivation is partially lost when the HF dip is followed by a water rinse which results in oxygen absorption on the substrate. It was found that the peak oxygen concentration at the epitaxy substrate interface increase by an order of magnitude due to a five minute water rinse. We report here that oxygen and carbon at the epitaxy substrate interface can be desorbed during initial stage of epitaxial growth by reducing epitaxial growth rate. In this work, epitaxial Si films were deposited over a wide range of growth rates obtained by varying Si2H6 flow rates. The peak oxygen concentration decreases by an order of magnitude by changing the growth rate from 3000 to 700Å/kminute for a deposition temperature of 800°C. We believe that at higher growth rates Si overgrows on absorbed oxygen maintaining epitaxial alignment reflected in the good electrical quality of the epitaxial films. However, at low growth rates oxygen has sufficient time to desorb before overgrowth can take place, improving the epitaxy substrate interface quality.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

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Cleaning during Initial Stages of Epitaxial Growth in an Ultrahigh Vacuum Rapid Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactor
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