Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-d8fc5 Total loading time: 0.228 Render date: 2021-09-22T19:02:38.285Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The Characterization Of Chemical Bath Deposited Cds On Single Crystal InP Substrates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

G. M. Riker
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401
M. M. Al-Jassim
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401
F. S. Hasoon
Affiliation:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401
Get access

Abstract

We have investigated CdS thin films as possible passivating window layers for InP. The films were deposited on single crystal InP by chemical bath deposition (CBD). The film thickness, as optically determined by ellipsometry, was varied from 500 to 840Å. The film morphology was investigated by high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM), whereas the film microstructure was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Most of the films were fine-grained polycrystalline CdS, with some deposition conditions resulting in epitaxial growth. Cross-sectional TEM examination revealed the presence of interface contaminants. The effect of such contaminants on the film morphology and microstructure was studied, and various approaches for InP surface cleaning/treatment were investigated. The epitaxial films were determined to be hexagonal on both the (111) and (100) InP substrates; however, they were heavily faulted.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Basak, R. L., Chaudhuri, S., and Pal, A. K., J. Mater. Sci. Let. 7 (10), p. 10481049 (1988), and References within.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Bhattacharyya, D. and Carter, M. J., Thin Solid Films 288, p. 176181 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Oladeji, I. O. and Chow, L., J. Electrochem. Soc. 7 (144), p. 23422346 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Webb, J., Rose, D., Niles, D., Swartzlander, A., and Al-Jassim, M. M. (Proc. 26th IEEE Photovoltaics Specialists Conf., Anaheim, CA, 1997), to be published.Google Scholar
5. Kylner, A., Rockett, A., and Stolt, L., Solid State Phenomena 51–52, p. 533540 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Vaccaro, K., Dauplaise, H., Davis, A., Spaziani, S., and Lorenzo, J., Appl. Phys. Lett. 24 (4), p.527529 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Choi, J. Y., Kim, K., and Kim, D. (Proc. 26th IEEE Photovoltaics Specialists Conf., Anaheim, CA, 1997), to be published.Google Scholar
8. Gallet, D. and Hollinger, G., Appl. Phys. Lett. 982, p.62 (1993).Google Scholar
9. Vaccaro, K., Davis, A., Dauplaise, H., Spaziani, S., Martin, E., and Lorenzo, J., J. Elect. Mat. 25 (4), p. 603609 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Vigil, O., Riech, I., Garcia-Rocha, M., and Zelaya-Angel, O., J. Vac. Sci. Tech. A 15 (4), p. 22822286 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Lincot, D., Mokili, B., Froment, M., Cortes, R., Bernard, C., Witz, C., and Lafait, J., J. Phys. Chem. B 101, p. 21742181 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Hasoon, F.S., Al-Jassim, M.M., Swartzlander, A., Sheldon, P., AI-Douri, A.A.J., and Alnajjar, A.A. (Proc. 26th IEEE Photovoltaics Specialists Conf., Anaheim, CA, 1997), to be published.Google Scholar
13. Walck, S. D. and McCaffrey, J. P., The Small Angle Cleavage Technique: An Update, (Poster at Microscopy Society of America Conference, Cleveland, Ohio, August 1997.)Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Characterization Of Chemical Bath Deposited Cds On Single Crystal InP Substrates
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The Characterization Of Chemical Bath Deposited Cds On Single Crystal InP Substrates
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The Characterization Of Chemical Bath Deposited Cds On Single Crystal InP Substrates
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *