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The Challenge for Large-scale Vapor-phase Growths of Not-catalyzed ZnO Nanostructures: Purity vs. Yield

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Davide Calestani
Affiliation:
calle@imem.cnr.it, IMEM-CNR, Parma, Italy
Ming Zheng Zha
Affiliation:
zha@imem.cnr.it, IMEM-CNR, Parma, Italy
Roberto Mosca
Affiliation:
mosca@imem.cnr.it, IMEM-CNR, Parma, Italy
Laura Lazzarini
Affiliation:
laura@imem.cnr.it, IMEM-CNR, Parma, Italy
Giancarlo Salviati
Affiliation:
salviati@imem.cnr.it, IMEM-CNR, Parma, Italy
Andrea Zappettini
Affiliation:
zapp@imem.cnr.it, IMEM-CNR, Parma, Italy
Lucio Zanotti
Affiliation:
zanotti@imem.cnr.it, IMEM-CNR, Parma, Italy
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Abstract

Large-scale growth capability is a general requirement for any reliable and cost-effective device application. Catalyst-free vapor-phase growth techniques generally let obtain high purity materials, but their application in large-scale growths of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures is not trivial, because the lack of catalysts makes the control of these process rather difficult. Three different optimizations of the basic vapor phase growth have been studied and performed to obtain selected and reproducible growths of three different ZnO nanostructures with improved yield, i.e. nanotetrapods, nanowires and nanorods. No precursor or catalyst has been used in order to reduce contamination sources as more as possible.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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