Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-n9d2k Total loading time: 0.14 Render date: 2021-10-24T03:57:15.123Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

CBE Growth of InP with Triethylindium and Metalorganic Phosphorous Precursors: Bisphosphinoethane and Tertiarybutyl-Phosphine

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

Albert Chin
Affiliation:
General Electric Electronics Laboratory, Syracuse, NY Presently at National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan, ROC
Steve Hersee
Affiliation:
General Electric Electronics Laboratory, Syracuse, NY Presently at University of Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
Paul Martin
Affiliation:
General Electric Electronics Laboratory, Syracuse, NY
John Mazurowski
Affiliation:
General Electric Electronics Laboratory, Syracuse, NY
James Ballingall
Affiliation:
General Electric Electronics Laboratory, Syracuse, NY
J. A. Glass Jr
Affiliation:
Dept. of Chemistry and the Center for Molecular Electronics, Syracuse University, NY
James T. Spencer
Affiliation:
Dept. of Chemistry and the Center for Molecular Electronics, Syracuse University, NY
Get access

Abstract

Two metallorganic phosphorous precursors, bisphosphinoethane (BPE) and tertiarybutyl phosphine (TBP), were studied. For indium phosphide (InP) grown using BPE, the measured room temperature and 77K Hall mobilities were 4,200 and 22,000 cm2/Vs, with carrierdensities 5.7E15 and 4.0E15 cm−3, respectively. For InP grown using TBP, the measured room temperature and 77K Hall mobilities were 4,400 and 26,000 cm2/Vs, with carrier densities 6.4E15 and 5.1E15 cm−3, respectively. An impurity build-up at the substrate interface is responsible for the relatively low mobility in the adjacent epitaxial layers. SIMS analysis showed that S and Si are the primary impurities measured in films grown with BPE and TBP, respectively; impurity concentrations increasedwith cracking temperature. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of donor bound exciton peaks measured by 2.2K photoluminescence for InP grown by BPE and TBP were 0.84 and 1.28 meV, respectively.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1993

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Panish, M. B. and Temkin, H., Ann. Rev. Mater. Sci. 19, 209 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Tsang, W. T., J Cryst. Growth 105, 1 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Razeghi, M., The MOCVD Challenge, Vol 1, (Adam Hilger Publishers, UK, 1989).Google Scholar
4. Haacke, G., Baur, B., Hoger, R., and Miklis, A., J. Cryst. Growth 105, 143 (1990).Google Scholar
5. Ritter, D., Panish, M. B., Hamm, R. A., Gershoni, D., and Brener, , Appl. Phys. Lett. 56, 1448 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

CBE Growth of InP with Triethylindium and Metalorganic Phosphorous Precursors: Bisphosphinoethane and Tertiarybutyl-Phosphine
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

CBE Growth of InP with Triethylindium and Metalorganic Phosphorous Precursors: Bisphosphinoethane and Tertiarybutyl-Phosphine
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

CBE Growth of InP with Triethylindium and Metalorganic Phosphorous Precursors: Bisphosphinoethane and Tertiarybutyl-Phosphine
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *