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Carbon Nanotubes as Optical Materials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Shaoxin Lu
Affiliation:
sxlu@udel.edu, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, 19716, United States
Ning Shao
Affiliation:
ningshao@udel.edu, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, 19716, United States
Ye Liu
Affiliation:
lyalex@udel.edu, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, 19716, United States
Balaji Panchapakesan
Affiliation:
baloo@ece.udel.edu, University of Delaware, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 140 Evans Hall, Newark, DE, 19716, United States, 302-831-4062, 302-831-4316
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Abstract

This paper discusses some of the highly interesting effects that occur when photons interact with carbon nanotubes. From position dependent photoconductivity of nanotube thin films to photon induced elastic actuation of carbon nanotubes is presented. A new field of micro-opto-mechanical systems (MOMS) is envisioned through the miniaturization of nanotube actuators using MEMS and CMOS processes. Number of remotely controlled MOMS devices including MOMS grippers, MOMS cantilevers and MOMS mirrors are presented. The performance of these devices rivals their MEMS electrostatic counterparts while consuming only fraction of energy and enabling remote controllability. Finally, the interaction of light with nanotubes for biomedical nanotechnology and photodynamic cancer therapy is presented.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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References

[1] Itkis, M. E., Borondics, F., Yiu, A.P., and Haddon, R.C, Science, 312 (5772) 413416, (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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[11] Lu, S. and Panchapakesan, B., Applied Physics Letters, (2007) in press.Google Scholar
[12] Lu, S., Shao, N., Liu, Y. and Panchapakesan, B., Nanaotechnology (2007) 065501.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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