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Carbon Cones - a Structure with Unique Properties

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Geir Helgesen
Affiliation:
geir.helgesen@ife.no, Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, Instituttveien 18, POB 40, Kjeller, NO-2027, Norway, +4763806083
Kenneth D. Knudsen
Affiliation:
knudsen@ife.no, Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, Kjeller, NO-2027, Norway
Jean Patrick Pinheiro
Affiliation:
Jean.Patrick.Pinheiro@ife.no, Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, Kjeller, NO-2027, Norway
Arne T. Skjeltorp
Affiliation:
arne.skjeltorp@ife.no, Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, Kjeller, NO-2027, Norway
Eldrid Svåsand
Affiliation:
eldrid.svasand@ife.no, Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, Kjeller, NO-2027, Norway
Henning Heiberg-Andersen
Affiliation:
henning.heibergandersen@gmail.com, Institute for Energy Technology, Physics Department, Kjeller, NO-2027, Norway
Arnljot Elgsaeter
Affiliation:
Arnljot.Elgsaeter@phys.ntnu.no, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Trondheim, NO-7491, Norway
Torgunn Garberg
Affiliation:
Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Trondheim, NO-7491, Norway
Stine Nalum Naess
Affiliation:
stine.nass@ntnu.no, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Trondheim, NO-7491, Norway
Steinar Raaen
Affiliation:
sraaen@phys.ntnu.no, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Trondheim, NO-7491, Norway
Merete F. Tverdal
Affiliation:
Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Trondheim, NO-7491, Norway
Xiaofeng Yu
Affiliation:
xiaofeng.yu@ntnu.no, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Trondheim, NO-7491, Norway
Thor Bernt Melø
Affiliation:
thor.melo@phys.ntnu.no, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Trondheim, NO-7491, Norway
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Abstract

Large-scale production of perfect conical carbon nanostructures that are fundamentally different from the other nanocarbon materials, such as buckyballs and nanotubes, can be made using the so-called Kvaerner Carbon Black & Hydrogen Process. This involves pyrolysis of hydrocarbons using a torch plasma process. The carbon cones that occur appear in five distinctly different forms. In addition, disk-shaped particles may be produced. Here we report about the current status for the experimental research and theoretical modeling of these particles, which have properties different from the other known forms of carbon.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2008

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References

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