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Breast Adenocarcinoma Cell Functions on Nanopatterned PLGA Surfaces

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 April 2012

Lijuan Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Brown University, RI 02912, U.S.A.
Thomas J. Webster
Affiliation:
School of Engineering and Department of Orthopaedics, Brown University, RI 02912, U.S.A.
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Abstract

The effects of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surface properties on lung epithelial carcinoma cell functions were previously identified. Results demonstrated decreased lung epithelial carcinoma cell vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) synthesis on 23 nm surface featured PLGA compared to the PLGA nano-smooth substrates. To investigate the universality of nanopatterned PLGA on inhibiting cancer cell functions, here, breast epithelial adenocarcinoma cell, MCF-7, early functions were determined on different PLGA nanometer surface topographies. Moreover, the viability of healthy breast cells was determined by an MTT assay to investigate the effects of nanopatterning on healthy breast cell growth. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) verified the varied nanotopographies on the PLGA surfaces prepared in this study. Importantly, results demonstrated significantly decreased breast adenocarcinoma cell functions (including decreased proliferation rate and decreased VEGF synthesis) on 23 nm featured PLGA surfaces compared to the other PLGA surface topographies (specifically, nano-smooth, 300 nm and 400 nm surface featured PLGA surfaces). In contrast, healthy breast epithelial cell studies indicated a 24% higher cell proliferation on the 23 nm featured PLGA surfaces compared to all other PLGA samples. In summary, these results provided further insights into understanding the role surface nanotopographies can have on selectively inhibiting cancer cell functions for a wide range of anti-cancer applications.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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References

[1] Dalby, M. J., et al. ., “The effect of the RACK1 signalling protein on the regulation of cell adhesion and cell contact guidance on nanometric grooves,” Biomaterials, vol. 29, pp. 282289, Jan 2008.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
[2] Kwon, K. W., et al. ., “Label-free, microfluidic separation and enrichment of human breast cancer cells by adhesion difference{,” Lab on a Chip, vol. 7, pp. 14611468, 2007.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
[3] Kim, P., et al. ., “Soft lithography for microfluidics: a review,” Biochip Journal, vol. 2, pp. 111, Mar 20 2008.Google Scholar
[4] Zhang, L. and Webster, T. J., “Decreased lung carcinoma cell functions on select polymer nanometer surface features,” Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, vol. 100, pp. 94102, Jan 2012.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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