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Biological Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2011

Ranjani Sirdeshmukh
Affiliation:
Delaware MEMS and Nanotechnology Laboratory Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringUniversity of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716
Kasif Teker
Affiliation:
Delaware MEMS and Nanotechnology Laboratory Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringUniversity of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716
Balaji Panchapakesan
Affiliation:
Delaware MEMS and Nanotechnology Laboratory Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringUniversity of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716
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Abstract

Carbon nanotubes are known for their exceptional mechanical and unique electronic properties. The size dependant properties of nanomaterials have made them attractive to develop highly sensitive sensors and detection systems. This is especially true in biological sciences, where the efficiency of detection systems reflect on the size of the detector and the sample required for detection. At approximately 1.5 to 10nm wide, and approximately 1.5 to 2μm long, the use of carbon nanotubes as sensors in biological systems would greatly increase the sensitivity of detection and diagnostics, for a reduced sample size consisting of few individual proteins and antibodies. Since all the atoms in carbon nanotubes are surface atoms, binding proteins or antibodies to the surfaces can greatly affect their surface states, and thus their electrical and optical properties. This effect can be exploited as a basis for detecting biological surface reactions in a single protein or antibody attached to carbon nanotube surfaces.

In this paper, we show the binding of fluorescently tagged antibodies in phosphate buffered saline on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes. Investigations using a confocal microscope suggest a significant interaction of the antibodies with the surfaces of the nanotubes, the intensity depending on incubation time. Since the surface area to volume ratio of CNTs is high, the use of surfactant to separate the nanotubes creates a greater surface area for antibody attachment. The interaction between CNTs and antibodies is seen to be primarily due to adsorptive surface phenomenon, between the nanotube sidewalls and antibody molecule clusters.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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