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Biodegradable Nano-Material Composites for Use in an Inkjet Printing System

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Nicole H Levi
Affiliation:
nlevi@wfubmc.edu, Wake Forest University, Physics, 328 miller st, winston-salem, nc, 27103, United States, 336-727-1806
John B. McGuirt
Affiliation:
mcgujb@wfu.edu, Wake Forest University, Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Department of Physics, Winston-Salem, NC, 27109, United States
Faith M. Coldren
Affiliation:
coldfm3@wfu.edu, Wake Forest University, Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Department of Physics, Winston-Salem, NC, 27109, United States
David L. Carroll
Affiliation:
carroldl@wfu.edu, Wake Forest University, Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Department of Physics, Winston-Salem, NC, 27109, United States
Corresponding
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Abstract

Biomaterials for development of resorbable, three-dimensional tissue scaffolds have been used in a modified thermal inkjet printing system to explore compatibility of materials, solvents and the printing system. The polymers included collagen (type I), sodium alginate, fibronectin, poly-lactic co-glycolic acid (PLGA), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and tetraglycol were tested. Single-walled carbon nanotubes were combined with the biopolymers to determine which systems in which they would blend well, and be able to print. Uncovering which biopolymers may be printed together offers insight into development of materials which most closely match the properties of biological tissue.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2006

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References

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