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Biocompatible Hybrid Plasmonic-Magnetic Nanoparticles for Bioimaging

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 March 2012

G.A. Sotiriou
Affiliation:
Particle Technology Laboratory, sotiriou@ptl.mavt.ethz.ch Institute of Process Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering
A.M. Hirt
Affiliation:
Institute of Geophysics, Department of Earth Sciences
P-Y. Lozach
Affiliation:
Institute for Biochemistry, Department of Biology Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich)
A. Teleki
Affiliation:
Particle Technology Laboratory, sotiriou@ptl.mavt.ethz.ch Institute of Process Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering
F. Krumeich
Affiliation:
Particle Technology Laboratory, sotiriou@ptl.mavt.ethz.ch Institute of Process Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering
S.E. Pratsinis
Affiliation:
Particle Technology Laboratory, sotiriou@ptl.mavt.ethz.ch Institute of Process Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering
Corresponding
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Abstract

Hybrid magnetic/plasmonic nanoparticles possess properties originating from each individual material. Such properties are beneficial for biological applications including bio-imaging, targeted drug delivery, in vivo diagnosis and therapy. Limitations regarding their stability and toxicity, however, challenge their safe use. Here, the one-step flame synthesis of composite SiO2-coated Ag/Fe2O3 nanoparticles is demonstrated. The hermetic SiO2 coating does not influence the morphology, the superparamagnetic properties of the iron oxide particles and the plasmonic optical properties of the silver particles. Therefore, the hybrid SiO2-coated Ag/Fe2O3 nanoparticles exhibit desired properties for their employment in bio-applications.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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