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Atomistic Simulations of Steps in Bimetallic Interfaces as Barriers to Interface Slip Transmission

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 March 2011

Charles H. Henager Jr.
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated for the U. S. Department of Energy by Battelle under Contract DEAC06-76RLO 1830. Richland, WA 99335-0999
Howard L. Heinisch Jr
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated for the U. S. Department of Energy by Battelle under Contract DEAC06-76RLO 1830. Richland, WA 99335-0999
Richard J. Kurtz
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated for the U. S. Department of Energy by Battelle under Contract DEAC06-76RLO 1830. Richland, WA 99335-0999
Richard G. Hoagland
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated for the U. S. Department of Energy by Battelle under Contract DEAC06-76RLO 1830. Richland, WA 99335-0999
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Abstract

Atomistic models of coherent interfaces in the CuNi system with and without (111)-steps were used to study slip transmission across interfaces in CuNi metallic bilayers. The lattice mismatch of the CuNi system results in large coherency stresses at the interface. The (111)-steps afford a larger barrier to slip than the flat, coherent interface. The coherent flat interface dislocation barrier is largely due to the large compressive stresses in the Cu layer that must be overcome by applied tensile stresses. Additional Koehler forces are present as the dislocation in the elastically softer Cu approaches the stiffer Ni layer. The step, however, possesses a small residual edge dislocation with a Burgers vector equal to the difference of bCu and bNi times the height of the (111)-step in (111)-layers. We find that these steps are potent slip barriers, which suggests that homogeneous slip is preferred in such systems.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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References

REFERENCES

1. Sinclair, C. W., Embury, J. D., and Weatherly, G. C., Mater. Sci. Eng., A, 1999, A272 90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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5. Hoagland, R. G., Kung, H., Misra, A., and Embury, J. D., Mater. Sci. Res. Soc. Symp. (submitted to this proceedings), 2001, 634.Google Scholar

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