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Aromatic Polyurea for High Temperature High Energy Density Capacitors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Yong Wang
Affiliation:
yuw113@psu.edugourdcn@hotmail.com, The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Electricalal Engineering, University Park, Pennsylvania, United States
Xin Zhou
Affiliation:
xuz113@psu.edu, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, United States
Minren Lin
Affiliation:
mxl18@psu.edu, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, United States
Sheng-Guo David Lu
Affiliation:
sul26@psu.edu, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, United States
Jun-Hong Lin
Affiliation:
jxl1009@psu.edu, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, United States
Qiming Zhang
Affiliation:
qxz1@psu.edu, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, United States
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Abstract

We investigate aromatic polyureas which can be fabricated in the form of thin films through CVD. It was found that the polymer possesses a flat dielectric response (k∼ 4.2 and loss <1%)) to more than 200°C. The frequency-independent dielectric properties in the investigated frequency range(1kHz∼1MHz), low conductance, low dissipation factor (∼0.005), high breakdown strength (>800MV/m), high energy density (>12J/cm3) and high efficiency suggest this polymer can be a good candidate material for high temperature energy storage capacitors. Breakdown strength was analyzed with Weibull model over a broad temperature range (25°C ∼180°C). Experimental results indicate that aromatic polyurea is more like a nonpolar linear dielectric material because of its highly cross-linked structures. The experiment results further show that this polymer maintains its high performance even at high temperatures.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

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